Conwy Palace Bingo – High Street

This Club Is Closed Or Demolished
club logo
  • Photograph by: David Lloyd - Exterior of the now closed Conwy Palace Bingo - High Street

Date of closure: Early 2013

Address (for reference only):

Independent Club
High Street
Conwy
LL32 8DB

At the moment we do not have details of the events that led up to, or any of the circumstances surrounding the closure of the Palace Bingo Conwy, but we do know a bit about about the venue’s history.

The Palace Cinema opened in 1936, with capacity for 700 patrons. The cinema was not purpose built, in fact the front was previously a house, although obviously a considerably large town house. The actual cinema itself was built onto the back of the house, this included stalls, and a balcony with its own cafe. Although not one of the grander interiors of the era, it did have columns aside the proscenium, and a domed ceiling. There were dressing rooms to accommodate the performers who ‘played’ in the seventies. The cinema side of things closed in the eighties, and bingo took over full time.

The building was bought in the summer of 2016 by Leicester businessman and film buff Ashley Whyatt for £155,000. Since then the owner and his son have been working on the building with the intention of reopening it as a cinema in early 2017. Obviously it has not yet opened, but the good news is that it should be open at some point in the year, providing the local community with a new focal point and source of entertainment.

There was talk in 2012 of Weatherspoons opening a new pub, and The Palace was mentioned as a potential site for one of their large public houses. Luckily, this didn’t come to pass, and hopefully the new owners will be doing their best to ensure that the remnants of the original interior remain true to character.

The architecture is of interest considering the building’s history. It looks nothing like any of the other cinemas built in the 1930s. The reason for this may be that the front of the building was converted from a house, having spent some time also serving as a bank. Having said that, it looks more like a church than anything else and is an extreme departure from the prevalent exterior design trends of the time.

A Grade II listed building, it looks like The Palace is here to stay in one form or another for at least the near future and has escaped the ‘scourge’ of the property developer.

By Gareth Whieldon (April 2017)

Other Lost Halls In The Area

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